In my experience teaching anthropology in the UK, one of my concerns is always to encourage students to acquire the habit of reading ethnographic monographs, suggesting that they might find such reading gratifying, that it will stimulate their interest, and enable them to engage fully with topics, places and peoples.

Perhaps members of this group might be interested in telling us about their favourite ethnographic monographs, why they are significant for their ongoing interests, and for anthropological discourse more generally?

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Dear Piers,
I find that the best way to motivate students to read is to shoiw them som egood films about indigenous societies. It stimulated their imaginiation, fascinates them in the exoeriences of other people and then they want to read on and understand. Some really good film for this are Rahul Roy's "The City Beautiful", a doco about weavers in uban Delhi, "Slumdog Millionaire", "Eyes of Stone" by Nilita Vachani about a young girl and her marriage problems in rural Gujerat, or the films that I made on the Kumbh Mela for C4. All are available from the RAI Film Library

All the best Mike Yorke
Michael- I could not agree more. At my previous university (Kent), they have now more formally integrated ethnographic film into the syllabus for students. I only wish my present university (University of Wales, Lampeter) had the resources to acquire more ethnographic film - there's only so many times I can show them my own film 'Servants of Ganesh: Inside The Elephant Stable' (http://www.oneworldfilms.com/)!

I am also keen to encourage students to watch the interviews with anthropologists that Alan Macfarlane has been collecting and collating at http://www.alanmacfarlane.com/ancestors/index.html As all anthropologists should realise, It is very helpful to put a face (and a person) to a name.
I am currently reading "Food, Gender and Poverty in the Ecuadorian Andes" by Mary J. Weismantel. Though my own research is on dreams, and the region I am focused on is in another major mountain range (Himalayas), the outline and organization of material in this book seem almost symphonic in their execution! I can't imagine a more perfectly presented ethnographic text. Anthropologists have too often (in my humble opinion) spent an enormous amount of their own sweat and blood only to be producing material that is boring and unreadable. Texts such as this one are pure pleasure! Oh, and film is a must!
I am happy to inform you that my new book titled 'Anthropology and Development in a Globalised India...' is my ethnographic work on Sericulture practice in South India. You can find the book link below:
http://www.c-s-p.org/Flyers/Anthropology-and-Development-in-a-Globa...

You can comment on the book also.

Regards
Kasi
Thanks for the advert (we all need to promote our work), but what are your favourite ethnographies of South Asia? The ones that made a major impact on you? That inspired you? That have been important for your teaching or research?

ESWARAPPA KASI said:
I am happy to inform you that my new book titled 'Anthropology and Development in a Globalised India...' is my ethnographic work on Sericulture practice in South India. You can find the book link below:
http://www.c-s-p.org/Flyers/Anthropology-and-Development-in-a-Globa...

You can comment on the book also.

Regards
Kasi

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