A long time ago many of us, and with all the big changes that the globalization has made on the societies We began to see how tools and our view had to change too.

Out and inside the discipline this stressed, in one hand very useful and estimulated, but as well a distractive courtain of our aims even hour epistemology.

We maybe say "The tree that not let see the wood"

Nowdays we are in extraordinaries moments that haven´t arrived in a parachutte. Between the denay and the scary plus what I said before inside and outside the discipline. They overholmed not only to all with the new political policies in USA...

...in that, all we are include- in spite many seems to be in cluds according with the age--, we ought to find understunding, to simbolized all this mess...

but........

my question is:::

Are we able in the state that we have arrived to this situation to do Anthropology? 

I consider we should take other ways of debats, take time, to do the things no focusing in stressed and lost the aims of our job.

Anthropoloogy can´t give all the answers, in any case to arrive to formulate the good questions to follow a research.

Today we have to asume that we should create other sees if we dont want to collabortate with this dangerous historical moment.

We are having debats , at least on this page, in historical frame in which two weeks ago, more and less, we could cope with them, now the frame is very different.

I hope to open a positive way for the debat.

Cecilia

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Is Anthropology enough? Enough for what, I wonder. Enough to ground the Kantian anthropology that Keith advocates? Enough to provide contemporary Candides with sheltered gardens, niches in which to pursue esoteric interests in things like Mayan hieroglyphics, Daoist magic, or the mating behaviors of bonobos and baboons? Or the interactions of man and mushroom (just now reading Anna Tsing's Mushroom at the End of the World)? To be useful to corporations or other large institutions? Or, as Lee suggests, to perform forensic analysis on dead or dying cultures?

just to have an  approach what  happens since  two  weeks on  the word...thanks!

Has anyone read Becker's What About Mozart? What About Murder? On pages 1-3, he addresses the inability of paradigms built on correlations between variables to anticipate radical change. Becker uses a series or reorganizations by the American electorate as his example.  He then moves to argue for the virtues of the case method as a counterweight.

To the extent that Anthropology has become a discipline of correlations, or has taken some seemingly secure correlations about attitudes and identities as eternal categories, then Anthropology is actively part of the problem. But it does not have to be part of the problem. Anthropology can change.... he wrote hopefully, but perhaps naively.

Thanks so much for your answer for two reasons, I like Mozart! (ji) more in this ages he gives some continuty ..you know there theories about him..I dont know them, well...and second that you have a conception with the kaleidoscope perspecvtive as a reference to try to appproach to this " radical change" ...is it radical? is it ? are we sure?

The concept of " discipline of correlations" for this I m not sure what kind of them we have the experience. In that case, it is notb only mantein the same Anthropology time by time......

by the moment I continue searching and very thanks to make thinks about "correlations" and "radical" meanings to work on them , to do a longo list...but as I said before I dont want a sundblind ..., it is a methafore of rolling, rolling...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcUh-ggBfzI

regards

Cecilia

Replace "radical" with "sudden." I was a bit sloppy. I didn't mean to imply the change had a particular direction, just that an existing arrangement was suddenly overturned.  

Michael, thanks for the pointer to What About Mozart? What About Murder? Serendipitously, I will be teaching Becker's Tricks of the Trade this semester. Are you, by the way, familiar with Ragin, et all, The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Analysis?

I have the other book, What is a Case?

Becker is great. The other day I met a French sociologist, recently transplanted to the Bay Area, at a networking event, who was greatly disappointed to learn that American sociologists do not read Becker. He has a large and active following in France.



John McCreery said:

Michael, thanks for the pointer to What About Mozart? What About Murder? Serendipitously, I will be teaching Becker's Tricks of the Trade this semester. Are you, by the way, familiar with Ragin, et all, The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Analysis?
What I find particularly interesting is small-n comparison, in which the usualrelationship of cases and variables in survey research is inverted, with a few cases and lots of variables instead of lots of cases and few variables. I am also old enough to appreciate references to Fred Egan's classic method of controlled comparison. In the beginning of What About Mozart (which is where I am at the moment), Becker begins with loosely connected cases that suggest concepts with application beyond the specific cases in question, pointing to Brazilian, American, and medical examples of people to whom I would apply the generic label "fixers," i.e., people who find economic niches in acquired expertise in dealing with bureaucrats and bureaucratic red tape. I find myself thinking that small-n, controlled comparison could be used to extend and solidify this kind of analysis.

Michael and John

Michal,   recuperating the initial of the question...to avoid courtains....

I consider when you say " sudden" instead of " radical" we could put them in the list of charactheristics together in these weeks with the new gov. in USA.

Thare are not incompability, this situation can combine even the ooposites, and why not new words and concepts  in order to elaborate, a thought and no yuxtaposition. As well to face the desesperation in front of "we dont have even a word" can open a new door.

Anthropology is being affecting too between these ideas of time and shape. We need to see others, and as well the "correlations".

I was thinking in the word "antisocial"

Alwyas thanks, 

Cecilia

Small n comparison is really Ragin's wheelhouse. Ragin is firmly in the tradition of comparison has it has been practiced in the social sciences.  As I read Becker, his theory of the case (couldn't help myself) is more in keeping with legal or medical practice.



John McCreery said:

What I find particularly interesting is small-n comparison, in which the usualrelationship of cases and variables in survey research is inverted, with a few cases and lots of variables instead of lots of cases and few variables. I am also old enough to appreciate references to Fred Egan's classic method of controlled comparison. In the beginning of What About Mozart (which is where I am at the moment), Becker begins with loosely connected cases that suggest concepts with application beyond the specific cases in question, pointing to Brazilian, American, and medical examples of people to whom I would apply the generic label "fixers," i.e., people who find economic niches in acquired expertise in dealing with bureaucrats and bureaucratic red tape. I find myself thinking that small-n, controlled comparison could be used to extend and solidify this kind of analysis.

I also had in mind "transformation." A boundary (threshold, limit) has clearly been crossed in American political life, and American politics has been transformed. Into what, exactly, remains murky.



Cecilia Montero Mórtola said:

Michael and John

Michal,   recuperating the initial of the question...to avoid courtains....

I consider when you say " sudden" instead of " radical" we could put them in the list of charactheristics together in these weeks with the new gov. in USA.

Thare are not incompability, this situation can combine even the ooposites, and why not new words and concepts  in order to elaborate, a thought and no yuxtaposition. As well to face the desesperation in front of "we dont have even a word" can open a new door.

Anthropology is being affecting too between these ideas of time and shape. We need to see others, and as well the "correlations".

I was thinking in the word "antisocial"

Alwyas thanks, 

Cecilia

Michael, could you say a bit more about why you think that Becker's theory of the case is more in keeping with legal and medical practice. Two reasons for asking: (1) Becker uses cases to reveal generic features of what may seem at first glance to be very different cases, to drive the formation of new theory; with some exceptions doctors and lawyers are primarily concerned with the relevance of established bodies of theory to particular cases. (2) Becker is, thus, able to employ cases that pop up in his personal experience without the grinding attention to detail that legal and medical practice require. Consider, for example, the experiences in Brazil and France that he describes in the opening chapter of What About Mozart.

I should note that I have no objection to this procedure. I enjoy and employ it frequently myself, and in what we might call the brainstorming phase of theory development it can be very useful. Then, however, science, a.k.a., serious scholarship, requires systematic pursuit of details that may falsify the speculations to which these casual comparisons give rise. It is in that phase that legal and clinical research and careful examination of all of the evidence come to mind.

I would also like to hear more about your thinking concerning "transformation." Abstractly speaking, I can think of at least two different kinds of transformations:

(1) those that preserve relationships through changes in perspective; good examples can be found in computer graphics programs, and the classic application in anthropology is Levi-Strauss attempt to demonstrate that all Native American myths are transformations of a relatively small set of underlying relationships, e.g., raw to cooked.

(2) those that radically alter relationships when systems undergo what physicists call phase shifts, when, for example, water becomes ice or steam, or a nuclear reaction becomes a bomb.

There is also the question how either of these types of transformations accurately describe social change, as opposed to conceptual models, also known as conventional wisdom. I think here of work like Stephanie Coontz' The Way We Never Were, which demonstrates that the bourgeoise nuclear family idolized in claims about American tradition was, even in its heyday, a rarity.

On a gut level, there is also the question of whether our contemporary transformations are more radical or extensive than those experienced by previous generations during industrialization, two world wars, and the Great Depression. I must say that I find myself remembering Marx in the 18th Brumaire, that famous quip about how revolutions occur twice, the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce.

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