The West African Yoruba goddess Yewa(the Yoruba of West Africa insist that their ancestors had been immigrants from the Nile region via the Lake Chad region)... The goddess Yewa(YHWH) becomes a model of the spirit possession medium in the spirit possession cult of Sango. The spirit of Sango, in turn, becomes the mythical seed of the heavens fallen to the earth: the bini ha-loyim (sons of God) who observing the beauty of the daughters of men (binot ha-'adam) chose wives from among them and produced as sons, the ha-gibbor-iym (men of fame, heroes of old).

The double-head of the thunder god's axe, in Yoruba tradition, is a symbol of the essentially two-faced androgynous (Sango-Yewa) nature of cosmic deity in his-her synthetic sky-earth identity (which explains why Sango is the patron deity of twins in the Yoruba pantheon of gods). In Yoruba tradition, the double axe-head of Sango is usually mounted on a female figurine: a representation of the Sango's feminine alter ego or doppelganger, that is, the chthonic goddess Yewa, in her model role as spirit possession medium in Sango's afterlife deification (Sango is supposed, like Jesus, to have died by hanging). The Yoruba believe, like Christians do, that the god Sango lived on, in the skyey realms, after he had apparently died on the stake, watching over mankind and punishing the wicked with lightning bolts from the heavens. John Thomas Didymus, author of "Confessions of God: The Gospel According to St. John Thomas Didymus.

 

 

The double axe symbol has been found at the egyptian City of the Hawk signifying two lands. In this ancient city It is the Desheret symbol of sedge and bee. Desheret has been shown to have a root connection to Deborah, Hebrew word for bee. http://bycommonconsent.com/2006/11/03/bcc-papers-1-2-barney/

 

The root of Deborah is Dabar (word of God) and is used more than 2.500 times in the Old Testament (first in Genesis 12:4). Over 110 English words and phrases are used to translate this one word alone. Dabar is used as the Order of Mechelzedek, the inner sanctum of the Holy of Holies, and the Word of God. It is used as Oracle, flit, speak, language, etc. Bee symbols are at the very heart of the afro-semetic language. Mn was the Egyptian god of the hive. The miraculous appearance of honey was attributed to him. Mn (with added Hebrew Heh) could be the Mannah (honeycomb) of Moses' Exodus sustaining the Israelites in the wilderness. I think it is interesting that the earliest Aramaic churches were hexagram shaped - a replica of a honeycomb cell. The hexagram shape is also the shape of the "inner sanctum" of the Magen David.

 

Beekeepers must be very careful and not introduce foreign organisms into hive. Hive collapse is a common and mysterious event. Even modern man has not fully solved this problem. The purity laws proscribed by priests entering the DBR/Inner Sanctum were quite specific. This priest must live 12 cubits from anyone else (and be downwind.) He must not have a discharge or come in contact with anyone that has a discharge within 7 days. He must bathe and then not touch any other part of his body with his hands. If he touches anything at all, he must wash his hands before he enters the inner sanctum. The man dedicated to entering the DBR would need to be supported because ritual purity requires intense effort and concentration. As a culture was built around the DBR, common symbols were deployed to build language required for the cooperative effort.

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Susan, I've cited your research here:

http://jandyongenesis.blogspot.com/2010/06/exacators-at-hierakonpol...

I hope you don't mind. You do good work and I'm glad to have made your acquaintance.

Best wishes,
Alice C. Linsley

Susan Burns said:
Scroll and suph are both made from the same plant. Another form of suph is grinding into flour and baking of loaves or cakes. This probably occured before emmer was hybridized. Chala and halav could have the same root. I need to research this when I have more time. Milk and honey could be sedge and bee and the double axe could be the totem for the merging of these two trading clans.

Alice C. Linsley said:
Susan, you are making great connections here! It is amazing how the pieces start to fall into place when one looks in the right place for information.

Ezekiel was told to eat the scroll - the word of God - and he found it sweet. I've read that the manna eaten in the wilderness might have been honeycomb.

Biblical Archaeology Review recently reported on "finds from Tel Rehov shed a bright light on domestic religious observance in ancient Israel and, like so many archaeological finds, raise unanswered questions, reminding us how little we really know. At 25 acres, Tel Rehov is one of the largest mounds in Israel. It is located a little more than half way up the Jordan Valley between the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee.

Rehov is mentioned in several Egyptian inscriptions. The latest one is an inscription of Shoshenq I at the temple of Amun at Karnak, Thebes. That inscription records more than 150 place names in relation to Shoshenq’s military campaign in the Land of Israel, around 925–920 B.C.E. This military campaign is also mentioned in the Bible, where Shoshenq is referred to as “Shishak” and the event is dated by the Biblical historiographer to the fifth year of King Rehoboam’s reign, shortly after Solomon’s death and the breakup of the United Kingdom into the separate states of Israel and Judah (1 Kings 14:25–28; 2 Chronicles 12:2–9)."

The beehives were evidence of an advanced honey-producing beekeeping industry 3000 years ago. There were 100 hives in neat rows. Tel Rehov was stronlgy influenced by Egyptian/Sudanese culture although these bees were more like the Antalyan bee of central Turkey.
I did research for a short time a few years ago on honey sellers in Addis and t'ejj bets (mead houses). The honey sellers were quite pragmatic and didn't have much or any-thing to say about cultural meaning, symbolism etc. But in the t'ejj bets, I found a lot of symbolism, only a little bit of it at the conscious level among the owners I interviewed. The colors of the average t'ejj bet mostly coincide with those of the national flag, which has a conscious symbolism. Right now, I'm on vacation and don't have access to my notes, so I'm a bit hazy on this. The red refers to raw meat eaten in t'ejj bets and to power/stength (perhaps virility). The green can reflect fresh grass on the floor and life and vitality as well as the source of the honey, which is used to make t'ejj. Yellow refers to at least honey.

Another feature of the t'ejj bets that I recall was the discarding of the top bit of the t'ejj from the drinking vessel. this is, to the best of my knowledge, never done with any-thing else (e.g., water, soft drinks). Different explanations were given, including to get rid of a part of the drink that was not good, 'it's just a tradition' and appeasing the supernatural.

I found it interesting that in many t'ejj bets there were both prominent anti-AIDS posters and a religious spot. I believe the only "t'ejj bet" that I was in where I did not see a religious spot was an up-class place that in almost all ways was radically different from the others I visited (light versus dark, open versus closed, expensive versus cheap, stand-offish versus either secretive or open and friendly).

There is a master's thesis on t'ejj bets at the AA U library, but I was unable to gain access to it.
Alice,
I am honored! Maybe I'm not a kook afterall?

Alice C. Linsley said:
Susan, I've cited your research here:

http://jandyongenesis.blogspot.com/2010/06/exacators-at-hierakonpol...

I hope you don't mind. You do good work and I'm glad to have made your acquaintance.

Best wishes,
Alice C. Linsley

Susan Burns said:
Scroll and suph are both made from the same plant. Another form of suph is grinding into flour and baking of loaves or cakes. This probably occured before emmer was hybridized. Chala and halav could have the same root. I need to research this when I have more time. Milk and honey could be sedge and bee and the double axe could be the totem for the merging of these two trading clans.

Alice C. Linsley said:
Susan, you are making great connections here! It is amazing how the pieces start to fall into place when one looks in the right place for information.

Ezekiel was told to eat the scroll - the word of God - and he found it sweet. I've read that the manna eaten in the wilderness might have been honeycomb.

Biblical Archaeology Review recently reported on "finds from Tel Rehov shed a bright light on domestic religious observance in ancient Israel and, like so many archaeological finds, raise unanswered questions, reminding us how little we really know. At 25 acres, Tel Rehov is one of the largest mounds in Israel. It is located a little more than half way up the Jordan Valley between the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee.

Rehov is mentioned in several Egyptian inscriptions. The latest one is an inscription of Shoshenq I at the temple of Amun at Karnak, Thebes. That inscription records more than 150 place names in relation to Shoshenq’s military campaign in the Land of Israel, around 925–920 B.C.E. This military campaign is also mentioned in the Bible, where Shoshenq is referred to as “Shishak” and the event is dated by the Biblical historiographer to the fifth year of King Rehoboam’s reign, shortly after Solomon’s death and the breakup of the United Kingdom into the separate states of Israel and Judah (1 Kings 14:25–28; 2 Chronicles 12:2–9)."

The beehives were evidence of an advanced honey-producing beekeeping industry 3000 years ago. There were 100 hives in neat rows. Tel Rehov was stronlgy influenced by Egyptian/Sudanese culture although these bees were more like the Antalyan bee of central Turkey.
I need to go there and see for myself. Visiting Addis is on my bucket list.

kim Dammers said:
I did research for a short time a few years ago on honey sellers in Addis and t'ejj bets (mead houses). The honey sellers were quite pragmatic and didn't have much or any-thing to say about cultural meaning, symbolism etc. But in the t'ejj bets, I found a lot of symbolism, only a little bit of it at the conscious level among the owners I interviewed. The colors of the average t'ejj bet mostly coincide with those of the national flag, which has a conscious symbolism. Right now, I'm on vacation and don't have access to my notes, so I'm a bit hazy on this. The red refers to raw meat eaten in t'ejj bets and to power/stength (perhaps virility). The green can reflect fresh grass on the floor and life and vitality as well as the source of the honey, which is used to make t'ejj. Yellow refers to at least honey.

Another feature of the t'ejj bets that I recall was the discarding of the top bit of the t'ejj from the drinking vessel. this is, to the best of my knowledge, never done with any-thing else (e.g., water, soft drinks). Different explanations were given, including to get rid of a part of the drink that was not good, 'it's just a tradition' and appeasing the supernatural.

I found it interesting that in many t'ejj bets there were both prominent anti-AIDS posters and a religious spot. I believe the only "t'ejj bet" that I was in where I did not see a religious spot was an up-class place that in almost all ways was radically different from the others I visited (light versus dark, open versus closed, expensive versus cheap, stand-offish versus either secretive or open and friendly).

There is a master's thesis on t'ejj bets at the AA U library, but I was unable to gain access to it.


The Nekhen finds are indeed astonishing. You would be interested in this:

http://jandyongenesis.blogspot.com/2013/05/sudan-is-archaeologicall...

I hope you are well, my friend.


Susan Burns said:

Alice,
I have been a subscriber to BAR for many years and am a very enthusiastic supporter of Herschel Shanks. The ceramic pots at City of the Hawk will turn out to be honeypots (IMO).

Alice C. Linsley said:
Susan, you are making great connections here! It is amazing how the pieces start to fall into place when one looks in the right place for information.

Ezekiel was told to eat the scroll - the word of God - and he found it sweet. I've read that the manna eaten in the wilderness might have been honeycomb.

Biblical Archaeology Review recently reported on "finds from Tel Rehov shed a bright light on domestic religious observance in ancient Israel and, like so many archaeological finds, raise unanswered questions, reminding us how little we really know. At 25 acres, Tel Rehov is one of the largest mounds in Israel. It is located a little more than half way up the Jordan Valley between the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee.

Rehov is mentioned in several Egyptian inscriptions. The latest one is an inscription of Shoshenq I at the temple of Amun at Karnak, Thebes. That inscription records more than 150 place names in relation to Shoshenq’s military campaign in the Land of Israel, around 925–920 B.C.E. This military campaign is also mentioned in the Bible, where Shoshenq is referred to as “Shishak” and the event is dated by the Biblical historiographer to the fifth year of King Rehoboam’s reign, shortly after Solomon’s death and the breakup of the United Kingdom into the separate states of Israel and Judah (1 Kings 14:25–28; 2 Chronicles 12:2–9)."

The beehives were evidence of an advanced honey-producing beekeeping industry 3000 years ago. There were 100 hives in neat rows. Tel Rehov was stronlgy influenced by Egyptian/Sudanese culture although these bees were more like the Antalyan bee of central Turkey.

Why after nearly 4 full years are you necro posting in order to advertise your own blog?

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