Would anyone be interested in compiling a reading list and/or reading some current publications and discussing them together online? I know Jessica was interested in doing this in a face-to-face setting in Norman, but maybe we could also participate vicariously online?

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I'm in Tulsa! I'll reply properly asap. Hope that everyone is well.
Here is a simple reading group project that I'd like to propose. As an experiment in using the open access publishing system known as Connexions, I republished Frank G. Speck's early essays of cultural criticism from The Southern Workman. These five essays derived from his studies of, and in, the Oklahoma and Indian Territories at the time of statehood. My hope is to write an introduction to this little collection of essays, but I would like feedback from colleagues before putting this together. Because of the ease with which corrections can be made to the "modules" (articles) in Connexions, I would also be happy to fix any typos that have slipped past me in the scanning and formatting process. My hope is that these essays will be of interest to other Oklahoma-minded folks. They also provide an opportunity to check out Connexions, which is a remarkable project aimed at many goals, including promoting collaborative research, writing and teaching projects and rebooting the textbook and publishing system in progressive ways.

In Connexions terms, a book-like thing is a "collection" and collections are made up of chapter-like things called "modules." Thus there is something like a small edited book available there now under the provisional title "Negro and White Exclusion Towns and Other Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory: Essays by Frank G. Speck from The Southern Workman." The title draws on two of Speck's essays "Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory" and "Negro and White Exclusion Towns in Indian Territory and Oklahoma." Three other essays are included. These essays focus specifically on conditions in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation: "The Negroes and the Creek Nation," "Notes on Creek Mythology," and "Missions in the Creek Nation."

Some Anthropology of Oklahoma members will have special insights into the Creek-related papers, but I think that the first two essays would be relevant to everyone's interests. They were written for a general audience in the Southern Workman and they are all very brief. I would welcome the thoughts of anyone who is willing to take a look at the papers and offer observations on them in their historical context or present-day relevance. Once can read them online as XML-generated webpages or download short printable module PDFs, download the the whole collection in a book-like format or get a print-on-demand book by mail. All but the last option is free. You'll find them all here: http://cnx.org/content/col10695/latest/

Comments can be added as comments here or sent to me by email. Perhaps there will be something in one of the papers that we could discuss as a group. For anyone who is too busy for such things, I am completely understanding. I have been too busy working over the past week in Oklahoma to keep up with my online life.
Jason,
Thanks for going to the effort to post this for us. I very much enjoyed reading these and plan to make further observations. Initially, let me just say that I found the module on Creek mission to be particularly fun (of course). Thanks!

Jason Baird Jackson said:
Here is a simple reading group project that I'd like to propose. As an experiment in using the open access publishing system known as Connexions, I republished Frank G. Speck's early essays of cultural criticism from The Southern Workman. These five essays derived from his studies of, and in, the Oklahoma and Indian Territories at the time of statehood. My hope is to write an introduction to this little collection of essays, but I would like feedback from colleagues before putting this together. Because of the ease with which corrections can be made to the "modules" (articles) in Connexions, I would also be happy to fix any typos that have slipped past me in the scanning and formatting process. My hope is that these essays will be of interest to other Oklahoma-minded folks. They also provide an opportunity to check out Connexions, which is a remarkable project aimed at many goals, including promoting collaborative research, writing and teaching projects and rebooting the textbook and publishing system in progressive ways.

In Connexions terms, a book-like thing is a "collection" and collections are made up of chapter-like things called "modules." Thus there is something like a small edited book available there now under the provisional title "Negro and White Exclusion Towns and Other Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory: Essays by Frank G. Speck from The Southern Workman." The title draws on two of Speck's essays "Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory" and "Negro and White Exclusion Towns in Indian Territory and Oklahoma." Three other essays are included. These essays focus specifically on conditions in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation: "The Negroes and the Creek Nation," "Notes on Creek Mythology," and "Missions in the Creek Nation."

Some Anthropology of Oklahoma members will have special insights into the Creek-related papers, but I think that the first two essays would be relevant to everyone's interests. They were written for a general audience in the Southern Workman and they are all very brief. I would welcome the thoughts of anyone who is willing to take a look at the papers and offer observations on them in their historical context or present-day relevance. Once can read them online as XML-generated webpages or download short printable module PDFs, download the the whole collection in a book-like format or get a print-on-demand book by mail. All but the last option is free. You'll find them all here: http://cnx.org/content/col10695/latest/

Comments can be added as comments here or sent to me by email. Perhaps there will be something in one of the papers that we could discuss as a group. For anyone who is too busy for such things, I am completely understanding. I have been too busy working over the past week in Oklahoma to keep up with my online life.
Thanks Jason! Sounds interesting, I will take a look.

Jason Baird Jackson said:
Here is a simple reading group project that I'd like to propose. As an experiment in using the open access publishing system known as Connexions, I republished Frank G. Speck's early essays of cultural criticism from The Southern Workman. These five essays derived from his studies of, and in, the Oklahoma and Indian Territories at the time of statehood. My hope is to write an introduction to this little collection of essays, but I would like feedback from colleagues before putting this together. Because of the ease with which corrections can be made to the "modules" (articles) in Connexions, I would also be happy to fix any typos that have slipped past me in the scanning and formatting process. My hope is that these essays will be of interest to other Oklahoma-minded folks. They also provide an opportunity to check out Connexions, which is a remarkable project aimed at many goals, including promoting collaborative research, writing and teaching projects and rebooting the textbook and publishing system in progressive ways.

In Connexions terms, a book-like thing is a "collection" and collections are made up of chapter-like things called "modules." Thus there is something like a small edited book available there now under the provisional title "Negro and White Exclusion Towns and Other Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory: Essays by Frank G. Speck from The Southern Workman." The title draws on two of Speck's essays "Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory" and "Negro and White Exclusion Towns in Indian Territory and Oklahoma." Three other essays are included. These essays focus specifically on conditions in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation: "The Negroes and the Creek Nation," "Notes on Creek Mythology," and "Missions in the Creek Nation."

Some Anthropology of Oklahoma members will have special insights into the Creek-related papers, but I think that the first two essays would be relevant to everyone's interests. They were written for a general audience in the Southern Workman and they are all very brief. I would welcome the thoughts of anyone who is willing to take a look at the papers and offer observations on them in their historical context or present-day relevance. Once can read them online as XML-generated webpages or download short printable module PDFs, download the the whole collection in a book-like format or get a print-on-demand book by mail. All but the last option is free. You'll find them all here: http://cnx.org/content/col10695/latest/

Comments can be added as comments here or sent to me by email. Perhaps there will be something in one of the papers that we could discuss as a group. For anyone who is too busy for such things, I am completely understanding. I have been too busy working over the past week in Oklahoma to keep up with my online life.
Jessica and Abby, Thanks for taking a look. I look forward to any comments the you come up with and I welcome the chance to talk about the essays with you and everyone else. Be well, Jason

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