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Anthropology of the Caribbean

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Anthropology of the Caribbean

What can the Caribbean mean? Where is it found? Who does it speak to? And what does it say? - Thoughts, convictions and knowledge from a Caribbean cultural perspective

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Freedom and Power in the Caribbean: The Work of Gordon K. Lewis

Started by Stacy A A Hope Nov 25, 2009.

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Comment by Astrid Franchiska Kowlessar on July 28, 2009 at 2:09am
I've blogged on cultural aspects in Trinidad, FYI.
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 10, 2009 at 4:13am
I have attempted to bring some clarity to my response in the edits below
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 10, 2009 at 4:10am
they too are being written out. My speculation is that the "blacking" out of the european minority is a direct reaction to the "racism" experienced in the Bahamian social experience, post-American Civil War.
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 10, 2009 at 4:01am
Gail Saunders (probably the most prolific of the emerging Bahamian voices), Michael Craton
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 10, 2009 at 3:57am
Columbus came for territory, personal power, and wealth. The Eleutheran Adventurers ( a company not purely a title) for freedom to trade and to establish trade (industrial then religious), Lord Proprietors (a carolina trade company), and so on.
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 9, 2009 at 5:27pm
hmmmn... a filler answer to the question set, is that the bahamas is globalization in its purest and globalization in a pure vein is The Bahamas. To this end i have mentally lightly reconstructed as a globalized entity located in the Atlantic region, but localized in global space.

It's pre-coloumbian experience is that of resource development and management, its post coloumbian experience has been resource exploration, development and management, the extent and intensity of which deepened only with direct advances in social, industrial, and economic technology.

Arawaks-who-became-Tainos-who-became-Lucayans utilized the islands first for fishing and primarily salt, then once entrenched moved further in search of these resources.

Columbus came for territory, personal power, and wealth. The Eleutheran Adventurers ( a company not purely a title) for freedom to trade and the establish (industrial then religious), Lord Proprietors (a carolina trade company), and so on.

So yes the story must be reconstructed from the mythalization of historians. Currently in The Bahamas a written historical tradition is growing helmed by researchers such as Gail Saunders, Michael Craton (probably the most prolific of the emerging voice), Virgil Storr, and others along with native anthropologists such as Nicolette Bethel, who are attempting to re-write The Bahamas large.

As to the historical representations of ethnicities other than the majority, they too being written out I suspect out of reaction to post-American Civil War social experience. Supporting girders of what is Nassuvian history are Greeks, Chinese, and Haitian (who are in an "erasure" of their own). The geography of The Bahamas further complicates investigation as the experience of the capital and social and economic hub of the islands chain is often termed The Bahamian Experience.

...ummmmn this has not turned out to be a short response... chuckle, but i will terminate it here and pick up a little later and actually address the specifics of your question... chuckle
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 5, 2009 at 5:16pm
British territory references points in periods up to early 20th century
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 5, 2009 at 5:13pm
As to the development of the various islands to the imperialist experience, it is only fair to consider different island developmental movements according to Spanish vs English vs French involvement. This is especially so given that The Bahamian Islands or Islands of the Shallow Seas has experienced both Spanish and English directions.

But before i get to far from my thought, the concept of "fictive kin" is even further affected by the intermovement between island localities. In The Bahamas, bodies and all associated with them were transplanted into the The Bahamas as means of governmental and trade development. This was seen in the presence of Bermudians, Jamaicans, and other British territority peoples on and in law enforcement and law creation bodies (Police and Government)

In post WWII times, more specifically post majority rule The Bahamas appeared to align itself with, yet retained selective inclusion, various regional alignments in efforts to benefit from Highly Industrial Country negotiations for collective bargining.

This "in, but not a part of" orientation would appear to transfer it self also to acts of identification as well....

Actually, that gives me another lens through which to contemplate this phenomenon also... chuckle
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 5, 2009 at 4:23pm
... additionally, from the perspective of the anthropology of power... hmmmn... maybe that is more a political perspective.. especially as it offers CARICOM, CSME, and or the difference between Eastern Caribbean and Central Caribbean geo-political realities...

hmmmn
Comment by Ishmael Smith on June 5, 2009 at 4:17pm
...as to perspectives from which to teach the Caribbean... the vantage provided from practitioners of The Anthropology of Tourism is an interesting one. Tourism remains the single most economic tool utilized by all
 

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