Dear All,

some colleagues of mine here in Brazil just got a huge grant for the comperative study of pentacostalism in verious regions of the world, including the former USSR. I just wondered about the impact of Pentacostalism in the Caucasus. Does anybody know anything? Any hint welcome!

Best,
Florian

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There were some events in 2002, violence against them, at least that seems to be their most significant online footprint for them. They aren't on the diversity.ge website or multinational.ge. They seem to be low on the Christian minority totem pole. Their leader is Oleg Khubashvili. I haven't heard anything on them since i've been here, June 2009. If you hear anything tell me too! I'd like to know more as well! Two articles I found:
http://www.ucsj.org/news/georgia-religious-minorities-face-escalati...
http://www.hrwf.org/religiousfreedom/news/georgia2002.HTM

Hulya
Yes, pentacostalism is spread in the Caucasus. The first group was appeared in 20-ies of the XXc. The first pentacostalists were ethnic Russians. Later after the second world war they become more active and fouded communities. In Georgia, in Tbilisi the first community of pentacostalists was founded in 1939 (mostly ethnically Russians). In 1945 was carried out the forst georgian lingual ritual in Gori. Now in Georgia are living approx. 5000 baptized pentacostalists of different trends (mostly charismats) they are ethnically Georgians, Armenians Ossetians and Russians.
Keti
Oleg Khubashvili is a leader of the biggest community. But there are the others as well, for example Mamuka Dzebisashvili he leads so-called neo-pentecostals.
Dear Keti,

this is wonderful information, thank you so much! Maybe in the future, there will be yet another joint research project on religion in Georgia, this time on Pentacostalism, and this times including colleagues from Brazil. What do you think? Are you ready?

gkotsni,
Florikuna

Ketevan Khutsishvili said:
Yes, pentacostalism is spread in the Caucasus. The first group was appeared in 20-ies of the XXc. The first pentacostalists were ethnic Russians. Later after the second world war they become more active and fouded communities. In Georgia, in Tbilisi the first community of pentacostalists was founded in 1939 (mostly ethnically Russians). In 1945 was carried out the forst georgian lingual ritual in Gori. Now in Georgia are living approx. 5000 baptized pentacostalists of different trends (mostly charismats) they are ethnically Georgians, Armenians Ossetians and Russians.
Keti
Is it not interesting and important to study the correlation of belief system and being practice; the dynamic of their challenges in the transitional or anomic societies, minority groups just as small communities? What are the “real ethnological” problems? I like the idea to search (or better to continue searching) religious minorities in the Caucasus, also in cooperation with the colleagues from Brazil.

Mec gkocni Florikuna (die Name hat mir sehr gefallen!)
Good questions, Keti, and I agree that research on Pentacostalism is interesting and relevant. Nikos question was meant to be provocative, I guess. First of all, his argument that the study of "religious minorities" is not anthropology is very narrow minded, to say the least. And historically wrong. Secondly, it discredits anthropologists like you and many of my colleagues in Brazil and at the Max Planck Institute in Germany having conducted high quality fieldwork on pentacostalism and questions of transnationalism, e.g. Nikos has been trying to stir up problems in other discussions before, but it looks like he hasn't learned his lessons. I, for my part, prefer to ignore his unqualified interventions.
I would think that understanding the practices of minority groups allows you to understand the larger group better. So of course, it had enormous relevance for understanding the society in general. Thanks Keti for the information on the Pentecostals in Georgia. I would personally love to know more about the context in which a person in Georgia learns about another faith (other than the "norm" of Orthodoxy), what draws him or her into it, what questions the new religion answers for him/her which orthodoxy did not. Actually for that matter, what does Orthodoxy answer? Any good sources on this, from the ground up, not necessarily for theologians.

Hulya

Ketevan Khutsishvili said:
Is it not interesting and important to study the correlation of belief system and being practice; the dynamic of their challenges in the transitional or anomic societies, minority groups just as small communities? What are the “real ethnological” problems? I like the idea to search (or better to continue searching) religious minorities in the Caucasus, also in cooperation with the colleagues from Brazil.
Mec gkocni Florikuna (die Name hat mir sehr gefallen!)
Dear Hulya, I would be interested in such kind of sources in reference to the Caucasus, too. Some of my former colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Germany did research on religion and conversion in Central Asia (Irene Hilgers, Mathijs Pelkmans, Julie McBrien, Johan Rasanayagam, Manja Stephan, hope I didn't forget anyone). The forthcoming volume of Hilgers, e.g., touches upon questions of conversion from Islam to Protestantism as well as the responses of state-sponsered Islam to this phenomenon. Good book, worth reading. I don't know of any comparable research in the Caucasus. Others know more? Keti, could you describe what kind of research you did exactly on "religious minorities" in Georgia? Which were your guiding questions?

Hulya Sakarya said:
I would think that understanding the practices of minority groups allows you to understand the larger group better. So of course, it had enormous relevance for understanding the society in general. Thanks Keti for the information on the Pentecostals in Georgia. I would personally love to know more about the context in which a person in Georgia learns about another faith (other than the "norm" of Orthodoxy), what draws him or her into it, what questions the new religion answers for him/her which orthodoxy did not. Actually for that matter, what does Orthodoxy answer? Any good sources on this, from the ground up, not necessarily for theologians.
Hulya
Ketevan Khutsishvili said:
Is it not interesting and important to study the correlation of belief system and being practice; the dynamic of their challenges in the transitional or anomic societies, minority groups just as small communities? What are the “real ethnological” problems? I like the idea to search (or better to continue searching) religious minorities in the Caucasus, also in cooperation with the colleagues from Brazil.
Mec gkocni Florikuna (die Name hat mir sehr gefallen!)
“ Pentecostal-charismatic Christianity (P/c) is considered to be one of the great success stories of cultural globalization.
Despite its origins in the West, just a hundred years after its birth, it is estimated that two thirds of P/c's estimated half a billion adherents live outside the West.
P/c culture has the characteristic of preserving its distinctness from the cultures into which it comes into contact and engaging those cultures on their own terms at the same time. “

Joel Robbins. The Globalization of Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity. 2004. Annual Review of Anthropology. Vol.33, pg. 117-144.

"A panel discussion that was part of "Spirit in the World: The Dynamics of Pentecostal Growth and Experience," held October 7, 2006.

Presented by the John Templeton Foundation and the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, this international symposium examines the global Pentecostal movement.

Donald E. Miller, Leonard K. Firestone Professor of Religion, executive director of the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, and director of the USC School of Religion, moderates.

Speaking on "Will a Man Rob God? African Pentecostal Rhetoric, Transnationalism and the Reconfiguring of a Global Religious Economy" is Afe Adogame, lecturer in world Christianity at the University of Edinburgh.

Speaking on "Competitive Spirits: Latin America's New Religious Economy" is R. Andrew Chesnut, professor of history at the University of Houston.

Speaking on "Pentecostalism as a Global Phenomenon" is David Martin, professor emeritus of sociology at London University."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tc7-z8V8Hnk

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