Can any body suggest, What could be the possible reading list for the Anthropology of South Asia

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Briefly:

Gloria Goodwin, and Ann Grodzins Gold. Listen to the Heron's words.

Diane Eck on Ganga

David Gellner Resistance and the State: Nepalese experiences. Also Priests, healers, mediums and witches

Patricia and Roger Jeffery on medical anthropology

Dumas Homo Hierarchicus (with articles critiquing this)

Talal Asad on postcolonialism and Barth

Jonathan Spencer on Sri Lanka

Katy Gardner Global Migrants, Local Lives:travel and transformation in rural Bangladesh

There is a lot of good stuff (see also the other list in the question beside this one) but you'll also need recommendations from someone who knows more about what South Asian academics have written. So that will often be under the umbrella of 'sociology', at least it is at Delhi University, but definitely worth getting some recommendations from those types. Also, you might want to think about what kind of themes to be teaching - do you want to do something about economy, something about timekeeping, something about kinship for instance?

Good luck!

Some syllabi available online:

http://dart.columbia.edu/southasia/syllabus/index.html

http://www4.uwm.edu/ire/syllabi_bank/campuses/.../Bornstein2.pdf

A few quick book suggestions:

Burghart, R. 1996. The Conditions of Listening: Essays on Religion, History and Politics in South Asia Delhi: Oxford University Press India.

Fuller, C.J. 1992. The Camphor Flame: Popular Hinduism and Society in India. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Guneratne, A. 2002. Many Tongues, One People: The Making of Tharu Identity in Nepal. Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press.

Mines, D. & S. Lamb (eds) 2002. Everyday Life in South Asia. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Parry, J. 1994. Death in Banaras. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Spencer, J. 2007. Anthropology, Politics and The State: Democracy and Violence in South Asia (New Departures in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Veer, P.v.d. 1994. Religious Nationalism: Hindus and Muslims in India. London: University of California Press.

Piers

 

In general anyone studying India should at some time read a version of Ramayana.  It is still key to understanding modern ideologies.

 

Are you looking for modern ethnographies or historical accounts?

 

Thank you. There are certain themes that I think most important. For Example the making of modern south asia looking at this through pre-colonial, colonial and post colonial perspectives. The second theme, offcourse the politics in South Asia including democracy, ethnicity and nationalism. and Third one for me should be the religion and society in south asia. Few books that you recommended are worth in this regard. Thank you.



Piers Locke said:

Some syllabi available online:

http://dart.columbia.edu/southasia/syllabus/index.html

http://www4.uwm.edu/ire/syllabi_bank/campuses/.../Bornstein2.pdf

A few quick book suggestions:

Burghart, R. 1996. The Conditions of Listening: Essays on Religion, History and Politics in South Asia Delhi: Oxford University Press India.

Fuller, C.J. 1992. The Camphor Flame: Popular Hinduism and Society in India. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Guneratne, A. 2002. Many Tongues, One People: The Making of Tharu Identity in Nepal. Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press.

Mines, D. & S. Lamb (eds) 2002. Everyday Life in South Asia. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Parry, J. 1994. Death in Banaras. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Spencer, J. 2007. Anthropology, Politics and The State: Democracy and Violence in South Asia (New Departures in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Veer, P.v.d. 1994. Religious Nationalism: Hindus and Muslims in India. London: University of California Press.

Piers

 

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