John McCreery
  • Yokohama, Japan
  • Japan
Share on Facebook
Share Twitter

John McCreery's Friends

  • Peter Wogan
  • Matthew Timothy Bradey
  • Muhammad Waqas
  • Mentor Mahmuti
  • Larry Stout
  • Mott T  Greene
  • Tracey Thornborrow
  • Paul Wilson
  • Patience kabamba
  • Erin B. Taylor
  • Kate Wood
  • Johannes Lenhard
  • Lee Drummond
  • Jendju Collins
  • Chelsea Hayman

John McCreery's Groups

John McCreery's Discussions

Phantom Epistemologies
12 Replies

Started this discussion. Last reply by John McCreery on Tuesday.

Should anthropology be more creative?
26 Replies

Started this discussion. Last reply by Cecilia Montero Mórtola Feb 10.

 

John McCreery's Page

Latest Activity

John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"Off the top of my head, I would point to the role of blood in ideas about kinship. The fundamental difference of kin vs other is, as we say, "in the blood." From this perspective, the vampire who takes his victim's blood and makes…"
3 hours ago
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"Louise, bravo! Thanks so much. Could you add a bit to your description of the Twilight fans? How diverse are they demographically? In ethnicity or religion? I must confess that my entirely speculative fan girl persona is young, white, a…"
3 hours ago
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"A few additional observations by way of comparative perspective Blood is a highly visible element in popular culture today. Slasher films (Friday the 13th, etc.) are gory in the extreme. Seen from this perspective, the Twilight books and…"
7 hours ago
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"That blood is a powerful symbol and hunger for blood is a defining characteristic of vampires cannot be denied. There is also much to be done with the notion of relating to animals as pets or predators, with most American males lacking experience…"
20 hours ago
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
yesterday
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion Phantom Epistemologies
"That's a good question. Could it be that what symbolic activity does is impose order on chaotic situations, enabling actors to get on with whatever they need or want to do without being paralyzed by information overload? Or course, whose…"
Tuesday
Jacob Lee replied to John McCreery's discussion Phantom Epistemologies
"The question I am asking is why a pattern of symbolic activity should be so orderly when the underlying causal processes are so complicated?"
Tuesday
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion Phantom Epistemologies
"Because it is something to be explained, or at least accounted for. There is also the interesting question why practitioners do not comprehend the grounds on which they are acting. How "everyone knows" becomes embedded in institutional…"
Tuesday
Jacob Lee replied to John McCreery's discussion Phantom Epistemologies
"Is it the productivity of the phenomena that we study, or is it the productivity of our own minds at finding meaning in the external world?"
Tuesday
Jacob Lee replied to John McCreery's discussion Phantom Epistemologies
"Why should something whose meaning practitioners not comprehend have meaning at all?"
Tuesday
Jacob Lee replied to John McCreery's discussion Phantom Epistemologies
"I can feel the intellectual and emotional satisfaction of having arrived at an interpretive frame by which something that seemed to be without sense, is given sense, and more, to behold!, it is beautiful. But, in the end, I am left in doubt. Very…"
Tuesday
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"In the interests of completeness and quality of evidence. 1. Meyer says that the books are centered around Bella's choice to choose her life on her own, and the Cullens' choices to abstain from killing rather than follow their…"
Sunday
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
Saturday
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"OK, message received. As for me, I am not here to entertain, stroke or destroy. I am here because I hoped to learn something, and Lee is an interesting guy, who sometimes has very smart things to say. I also happen to care deeply about such…"
Saturday
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"Academics are such sensitive souls. It's a wonder they survive at all. That said, in Lee's case, I fully expect that he will come back stronger for the challenge. "
Apr 11
John McCreery replied to Keith Hart's discussion From the Center for Peripheral Studies (OAC Branch). After Lance, the sky's the limit!
"Peevish? No. Just doing something to you that was frequently done to me, much to my benefit, while working in advertising. When I had a great idea, people praised it. When the idea was crap, people said so. I still vividly remember being taken aside…"
Apr 11

Profile Information

Full Name (no screen names or handles)
John McCreery
School/Organization/Current anthropological attachment
Independent Scholar, Executive Committee AJJ
Website
http://www.wordworks.jp

John McCreery's Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All

John McCreery's Blog

Who says anthropology can't rock?

Serendipitously, the entertainment section in this morning's Japan Times carries an article about an Indie band, three young Japanese women, called Crunch. One of them, Noriyo Hotta says,



"For example, take 'Mori no Naka,' the first track on the album. This song was influenced by Radiohead, especially the songs 'Jigsaw Falling' and 'There There,' and a funk tune by Japanese rock band Jagatara called 'Tango.' But I was also inspired by a book about the Yanomami tribe in the Amazon.… Continue

Posted on March 5, 2014 at 3:06am

Collective? Individual? Both? How should we think about thinking?

Just found an interesting piece titled "Good Group Think" on eighteen chains.com. Resurrects some shrewd observations by Karl Mannheim, from Ideology and Utopia. Most of what we think we learn from others. We add a bit and pass it on. Tracing the routes is a project called the sociology of knowledge. Enjoy. Reflect. Respond. Pass it on.

Posted on February 3, 2014 at 8:29am — 7 Comments

How would you cope with calamity?

Last night I was at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan in Tokyo attending a "Book Break." The book in question was Japan Copes with Calamity: Ethnographies of the Earthquake, Tsunami and Nuclear Disasters of March 2011, ed. by Tom Gill, David Slater, and Brigitte Steger. I don't know Brigitte, but Tom and David are old friends. Both are anthropologists, one from the…

Continue

Posted on February 1, 2014 at 2:53am

How would you rate the Proctontologist?

Yesterday, in a comment on the Lee Drummond forever thread, I posted the following quote from proctontologist.weebly.com:

“Ontologicality is a proctology, but only if you allow for the proctological to speak its ontologicality. Ontology is just a set of assumptions postulated by the anthropologist for analytical purposes. Indeed, it is well worth pointing out that such an exercise in conceptual creativity needn’t be territorialized with reference to any…

Continue

Posted on January 27, 2014 at 4:40am — 6 Comments

Ritual, Liminality, and Social Facts

I have recently been engaged on LinkedIn with Jonathan Cook, who is writing a book about ritual in the advertising business. It has been a delightful conversation, with a lot of productive to and fro, but yesterday Jonathan wrote something that I strongly disagreed with. In responding to him, several different arguments that I have been thinking about for years suddenly clicked into place. Here is what I wrote. I will be happy if it proves useful to someone who reads it, ecstatic if they reply… Continue

Posted on January 26, 2014 at 2:58am — 2 Comments

Comment Wall (32 comments)

You need to be a member of Open Anthropology Cooperative to add comments!

Join Open Anthropology Cooperative

At 6:52am on April 3, 2014, Peter Wogan said…

Thanks, John. Sorry to be away, but nice to know I'm missed! More to follow...

Peter

At 1:43pm on March 2, 2013, Larry Stout said…

The "Grey People" are found at yet another fishing village along the same coast of Gaspesie.  It's a very interesting and scenic drive, all the way around the peninsula.  You see the flag of Acadie flying there, and in parts of New Brunswick,often to the exclusion of the Canada flag.

At 12:17pm on March 2, 2013, Larry Stout said…

Hi, John  -- The "Blue Men" are the work of an old woodcarver who has a shop in a fishing village on the St. Lawrence seaway in Gaspé, Quebec.  He fashioned them from driftwood logs and gave them a beautiful lapis lazuli panache.  I told him that when I win the lottery I'll fly him down to Ozarkistan and pay him handsomely to create similar art for our backyard (near our inukshuk).

At 11:40pm on January 11, 2013, Tracey Thornborrow said…

thanks for that John, I shall check it out! 

At 11:30pm on November 8, 2012, Kate Wood said…

Sorry for the late response, I am not good at social networking! :) 

At 3:45am on September 15, 2012, Keith Hart said…
See OAC Facebook.
At 12:46pm on September 9, 2012, Sheyma Buali said…

sounds great, thanks a lot for the suggestion! im looking at it and it shall indeed be helpful!

At 3:16pm on June 28, 2012, Logan Sparks said…

thanks, John, for the article. its very interesting. I am actually looking into what else Neslihan Cevik has written...

At 2:41am on May 6, 2012, Chelsea Hayman said…

Thank you John for your excellent response and the great clarification! It's been awhile since those undergrad theory classes, but I did learn a lot from them, even though they were so long ago. Now I am trying to manage a theory class in my Master's course that was combined with ethnography -- except the weeks seem to be organized thematically rather than chronologically. Or in order of influence rather than historical period. All of this can be rather frustrating for a student, who can make misleading assumptions based on when the material was presented! All very confusing. Thank you for sorting that information out for me - we did not discuss the Boasians at length in my class but rather focused mostly upon Geertz. Such is the nature of the British school of Anthropology. I'll have to post more blogs about theory - I always have lots of questions and need for clarification. I wish I had more time to learn about the historical context in which some of these ideas developed, but I should have plenty of time when I graduate to read freely. :)

At 11:44am on March 21, 2012, Chelsea Hayman said…

John, firstly, thank you for all of your input. I completely agree with what you said about the 'Western' - the idea is pretty totalizing and inaccurate in and of itself. I've been looking into more ontological theory and non-dualism since I've been studying for my Master's. I think it's easy to set up a dichotomy almost as a polemical point of departure and I guess I have been using it more evocatively in thinking through some of the ideas that have been on my mind for the past couple of weeks. I will look into the material you suggested and see what I can come up with. I suppose my main issue with conceptual categories is that they can be so linguistically conditioned, but they also have some grounding in our ideas about rationality, which can also be variable depending upon one's education. I think that's an idea I've been struggling with. I don't necessarily think the authors are arguing against that point, but it seems to be an often unidentified issue in the cognitive science literature. Of course, the anthropological literature addresses it rather well, on the whole. What are you up to in Japan? I see that you work as an independent scholar - what kinds of work do you do? I'm interested because I've considered a non-academic career in applied anthropology. Thank you again for your input, I appreciate it greatly.

 
 
 

Translate

@OpenAnthCoop

© 2014   Created by Keith Hart.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service