John McCreery's Comments

Comment Wall (31 comments)

You need to be a member of Open Anthropology Cooperative to add comments!

At 6:52am on April 3, 2014, Peter Wogan said…

Thanks, John. Sorry to be away, but nice to know I'm missed! More to follow...

Peter

At 1:43pm on March 2, 2013, Larry Stout said…

The "Grey People" are found at yet another fishing village along the same coast of Gaspesie.  It's a very interesting and scenic drive, all the way around the peninsula.  You see the flag of Acadie flying there, and in parts of New Brunswick,often to the exclusion of the Canada flag.

At 12:17pm on March 2, 2013, Larry Stout said…

Hi, John  -- The "Blue Men" are the work of an old woodcarver who has a shop in a fishing village on the St. Lawrence seaway in Gaspé, Quebec.  He fashioned them from driftwood logs and gave them a beautiful lapis lazuli panache.  I told him that when I win the lottery I'll fly him down to Ozarkistan and pay him handsomely to create similar art for our backyard (near our inukshuk).

At 11:40pm on January 11, 2013, Tracey Thornborrow said…

thanks for that John, I shall check it out! 

At 11:30pm on November 8, 2012, Kate Wood said…

Sorry for the late response, I am not good at social networking! :) 

At 3:45am on September 15, 2012, Keith Hart said…
See OAC Facebook.
At 12:46pm on September 9, 2012, Sheyma Buali said…

sounds great, thanks a lot for the suggestion! im looking at it and it shall indeed be helpful!

At 3:16pm on June 28, 2012, Logan Sparks said…

thanks, John, for the article. its very interesting. I am actually looking into what else Neslihan Cevik has written...

At 2:41am on May 6, 2012, Chelsea Hayman said…

Thank you John for your excellent response and the great clarification! It's been awhile since those undergrad theory classes, but I did learn a lot from them, even though they were so long ago. Now I am trying to manage a theory class in my Master's course that was combined with ethnography -- except the weeks seem to be organized thematically rather than chronologically. Or in order of influence rather than historical period. All of this can be rather frustrating for a student, who can make misleading assumptions based on when the material was presented! All very confusing. Thank you for sorting that information out for me - we did not discuss the Boasians at length in my class but rather focused mostly upon Geertz. Such is the nature of the British school of Anthropology. I'll have to post more blogs about theory - I always have lots of questions and need for clarification. I wish I had more time to learn about the historical context in which some of these ideas developed, but I should have plenty of time when I graduate to read freely. :)

At 11:44am on March 21, 2012, Chelsea Hayman said…

John, firstly, thank you for all of your input. I completely agree with what you said about the 'Western' - the idea is pretty totalizing and inaccurate in and of itself. I've been looking into more ontological theory and non-dualism since I've been studying for my Master's. I think it's easy to set up a dichotomy almost as a polemical point of departure and I guess I have been using it more evocatively in thinking through some of the ideas that have been on my mind for the past couple of weeks. I will look into the material you suggested and see what I can come up with. I suppose my main issue with conceptual categories is that they can be so linguistically conditioned, but they also have some grounding in our ideas about rationality, which can also be variable depending upon one's education. I think that's an idea I've been struggling with. I don't necessarily think the authors are arguing against that point, but it seems to be an often unidentified issue in the cognitive science literature. Of course, the anthropological literature addresses it rather well, on the whole. What are you up to in Japan? I see that you work as an independent scholar - what kinds of work do you do? I'm interested because I've considered a non-academic career in applied anthropology. Thank you again for your input, I appreciate it greatly.

At 9:46pm on December 2, 2011, Adonia Lugo said…

Thanks for the note! I'm thanking my lucky stars that OAC still exists.

At 4:14pm on November 27, 2011, Halbert Barton said…

Thanks for the tip! Sent a friend req. Re: East Asia. I studied with Steve Sangren at Cornell...the world is getting smaller already.

At 4:28pm on November 26, 2011, Halbert Barton said…

For the more advanced classes there is enough overlap on holistic issues so I'm not totally schizo, e.g. biocultural perspectives on Race & Ethnicity, Gender & Sexuality, etc.

At 4:20pm on November 26, 2011, Halbert Barton said…

The range of people here sounds terrific. I teach the full spectrum of intro classes, from biological to cultural. While my primary research interests are on the cultural side (Puerto Rico, Caribbean popular culture, ethnogenesis, etc.), I do my best to stay on top of the latest developments in primatology and paleoanthro (my first loves). Given the student population at LIU (mostly 1st generation college students from the Caribbean), I find myself teaching voodoo & evolution to Pentecostals much of the time. Keeps me on my toes!

 

 

At 3:31pm on November 26, 2011, Halbert Barton said…

Thanks John! I look forward to jumping in on some great conversations...learning and contributing as much as I can. I've been hoping to join a group like this for a long time, glad I stumbled on it. I'm a bit of a "generalist" teaching in a small department, so this is like being a kid in a candy store.

 

At 10:50pm on March 13, 2011, Francine Barone said…

John, thanks for sharing your updates from Japan. I'm happy to hear that you're safe and well. Keep us informed.

At 10:41pm on March 13, 2011, Paul Wren said…
Glad to hear you and your wife are safe, John.
At 12:57pm on February 24, 2011, Dr. Udai Pratap SINGH said…
would anthropology like you like to accept my friendship !
At 3:46pm on November 14, 2010, Robert Guang Tian said…
John: Anytime when you are springed you can write to us. I belive given what you have done in Japan your articles will be widely enjoyed by our redearship.

Robert
At 3:55am on May 28, 2010, Rick Holden said…
I'm not looking for an academic job. I know that in America the idea of a practicing anthropologist in a non-traditional field is just now becoming more normal, even if still not common. In Japan I know that archaeologists get a lot of work, but I had heard from others that there really isn't a market for an anthropological social science for either business or government. I was wondering if you had anything to say about that. I'm flexible, but I have no idea where to even look. A few years ago I applied to a bunch of English teaching positions, but the bottom was already falling out of that market.

Has the population crisis caused a more liberal VISA system yet?

Translate

OAC Press

@OpenAnthCoop

Events

© 2017   Created by Keith Hart.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service