Nold Egenter's Comments

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At 3:36pm on March 27, 2011, Felicity Bano said…

Hi Nold,

Thank you so much for the papers, they are exactly what I have been trying to research, i was suprised about how little the subject has been looked into until discovering your work. The papers have clarified exactly how the history archetecture is reseached from an anthroplogical perspective for me, as well as provided more information about what has been discovered. I am sorry to hear you have not been well and hope everything is better now, the Surbition address will be fine for sending any texts on anthropology.

Kind Regeards

Felicity Bano

At 6:49pm on March 3, 2011, Fabiano Souto said…
Hi, thank Nold. Good job your own. I'll see it easy. Best wishes.
Fabiano Souto
At 10:19pm on January 25, 2011, Peter I. Pap said…
Kindly thanking your comment. There was no delay at all!

respectfully
At 4:52pm on December 20, 2010, Felicity Bano said…

Hi Nold,

Thank you for the friend request! I am in sixth form and so am fairly new to anthropology. I found the way humans interact with the surrounding environment particually interesting and so decided to do an extented project looking at the anthropology of archetecture, I have found your work so interesting and the main source of my research. It has taken quite along time to reseach all the anthropological theory to have a basis on which to understand the research into archetectural anthropology but I have found it extremly rewarding, particually the challenge to convential archetectural theory of the modern archetects, I think it would be interesting to build a piece or archetecture today taking into account the notion of design from an anthropological perspective!

Thank you so much for all the research that has been so useful to me, I look forward to studying more of your work.

At 12:43pm on August 25, 2010, MAI Saptenno said…
Dear Nold: Thank you very much for your information. I’m pretty sure that your forum is one of the most challenging forums for the lot of us who want to learn about your topic. I apologize for not responding soon as I had to go back and forth to the field so couldn’t write a proper respond to some of the interesting points from your Discussion Forum.

So far, I could say that your brief information on the videos and the videos themselves made me question the evolution of spatial signs and aesthetic symbols. I think they are somewhat the dimensions of iconology and psychosemiotics or something of Eco’s double articulation of code. I’m looking forward to other elaboration of your topic.

Warm regards
Inez


"In view of the present structure of cultural anthropology I think the concept of “habitat and constructive behavior” (or architecture) could produce a new focus point of cultural study in a field which is extremely heterogeneous, following essentially the historical concept of disciplines with their endless attempts to find an approach which could give us a general view on cultural conditions also in the sense of evolutionary processes. Habitat? Isn'this a general human condition at least explicitly documented from Neolithic times? Could it be a basic model for the development of civilisation, at least in the sense of spatial organisation of centralised city-states? Was construction/ architecture important in providing spatial signs and aesthetic symbols which produced an early spatial and symbolic order concept to these local settlements which formed the core principle for many secondary evolutionary processes?"
At 11:01am on August 5, 2010, Lamia Dorner said…
to bee or not to bee? c'est la grande question et je partage votre grande réponse
At 5:32pm on August 3, 2010, MAI Saptenno said…
Hello Nold:
Thank you for the welcome. I’d like to say first that your videos trigger many questions in my head and so I want to learn more from you and this forum. Your propositions provoke me to begin with a Wittgensteinean ritual of the 'meaning' is the use and following its continual sliding, in my confusion, I agree that the open texture has no limits. And yet, considering that as anthropologists we’re continuously exploring cultural processes, where nature hides behind the palimpsest of aesthetics, I opt for the ‘dessert of the real’ and wait where the simulacra will lead me, tagging along my pagoda box.
At 6:41pm on June 30, 2010, Lamia Dorner said…
Question: quel phénomène n'est pas culturel?
At 10:13am on February 15, 2010, Elizabeth Stanfield said…
Hi Nold!
Thank you for your thoughts: I agree that a comparative approach to understandings of 'normal' as it connects to architecture could be quite fascinating...
Would be quite the undertaking, but how interesting!
At 1:37pm on December 27, 2009, Vito Laterza said…
Thanks, Nold. I have read the thread and will try to catch up with the pdfs as well. Me and my partner have been chatting a lot lately about nestbuilding behaviour in apes and humans after reading your post and following your youtube video! All the best and happy new year to you too!
At 5:56am on September 9, 2009, Mylene Hengen said…
American Indian, that is
At 5:56am on September 9, 2009, Mylene Hengen said…
Is "interesting approach" supposed to be a good thing? In any case yes, I'm investigating the use of the visual (art, specifically) within collective action on the North American continent.
At 9:32am on June 1, 2009, Keith Hart said…
Thank you, Nold. I am very glad that we can carry on an exchange about anthropology's past and future here.

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