John McCreery
  • Yokohama, Japan
  • Japan
Share on Facebook
Share

John McCreery's Friends

  • Kristian Garthus-Niegel
  • Manal
  • Louise Krasniewicz
  • Peter Wogan
  • Matthew Timothy Bradey
  • Muhammad Waqas
  • Mentor Mahmuti
  • Larry Stout
  • Mott T  Greene
  • George D Baca
  • Tracey Thornborrow
  • Paul Wilson
  • Patience kabamba
  • Erin B. Taylor
  • Kate Wood

John McCreery's Discussions

The Anthropology of Irrationality
87 Replies

Started this discussion. Last reply by John McCreery Jul 6.

Tim Ingold's "That's Enough About Ethnography"--The Seminar is Underway
122 Replies

Started this discussion. Last reply by John McCreery Apr 2.

Tim Ingold's "That's Enough About Ethnography"—Invitation to an informal seminar
9 Replies

Started this discussion. Last reply by John McCreery Mar 23.

 

John McCreery's Page

Latest Activity

John McCreery commented on Neil Turner's blog post Tristes Tropiques: Revisited
"Neil, I have just got around to reading this post, and a great reading of Tristes Tropiques it is. It strikes me as too perfect to stimulate conversation in an online medium where "dialogue" is usually Punch 'n Judy…"
Jul 22
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"Our search for an anthropology of the irrational is apparently over. Apologies to all for the intemperance of my last few remarks. An irrational ending for what was, in any case, likely to be a Quixotic quest."
Jul 6
John McCreery replied to Cecilia Montero Mórtola's discussion What a glad! Teachers of A-level Anthropology having a workshop and talking, talking, ....
"Cecilia, I like your exercise. I like it a lot. Sitting down and trying to describe in your own words just what it is that you don't understand can be very educational. In my own case, this lesson is associated with some very tough,…"
Jul 6
John McCreery replied to Cecilia Montero Mórtola's discussion What a glad! Teachers of A-level Anthropology having a workshop and talking, talking, ....
"Cecilia, It sounds like you had a good time. Could you tell us more about the content taught in A-level anthropology in the UK?"
Jul 6
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"On why poor white people are conned by the the right wing, one important explanation is the Republican Party's Southern Strategy. See http://www.liberalamerica.org/2015/05/18/what-poor-vote-republican/ For the particular case of Kansas,…"
Jul 4
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"Could it be, horror of horrors, that sociologists do anthropology better than anthropologists do? See, for example,…"
Jul 3
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"Just like one of those ass-kicking, now of only historical interest, Kansans you mention? Or the current generation of saps who have brought the big con? "I'm hurt! I'm insulted! I can't stand being patronized! I'll take my…"
Jul 3
Huon Wardle replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"Maybe. Meanwhile here is some sage advice from Philip Larkin: “They fuck you up, your mum and dad.They may not mean to, but they do.They fill you with the faults they hadAnd add some extra, just for you.But they were fucked up in their turnBy…"
Jul 3
Kristian Garthus-Niegel replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"My intuitive prediction is that when all else fails, who's gonna step off the fence and save the day is Mutti. The one thing Tricksters can't trump (and I think there's a raw irrational basis to this) is powerful female figures."
Jul 3
Huon Wardle replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
Jul 3
Kristian Garthus-Niegel replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"Huon, as your recent Menandric gamble example shows, the reigning cultural setup is fundamentally organized to cream the trickster. As for instance represented in Handelsblatt (Germany's Wall Street Journal) last week: ("Give me the…"
Jul 3
Kristian Garthus-Niegel replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"The irrational redux Master Representation of our times (as Lakoff and Johnson would have it, up=relax): Thanks for your project description Lee. I'll vote in your favor. Those not feint of heart, enjoy some true suburban Swedish…"
Jul 3
Lee Drummond replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"  Kristian:  “So Lee, let's say you got a grant to cover, say, 6 full time researchers for five years, to carry out a project to explore the role of irrationality in social life; as the research leader, how would you set it…"
Jul 3
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"As a possible new line to pursue I offer the following remarks from an email to a young German researcher, a "culture manager" with an interest in the relationship of social networks to art worlds. Before I try to explain what I meant,…"
Jul 2
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"Lee, If I sound irritated and more obnoxious than usual it is because I expect much more from you than you have been giving us lately. In American Dreamtime you not only point to contradictions, you provide an analytic framework that deepens our…"
Jul 2
John McCreery replied to John McCreery's discussion The Anthropology of Irrationality
"This is a very good question, indeed. "
Jul 1

Profile Information

Full Name (no screen names or handles)
John McCreery
School/Organization/Current anthropological attachment
Independent Scholar, Executive Committee AJJ
Website
http://www.wordworks.jp

John McCreery's Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All

John McCreery's Blog

Some people take culture seriously. Why?

With a tip of the hat to Bill Bishop at Sinocism,

Cultural reflection can improve modern governance: Xi - Xinhuaat Politburo study session  //  Xi argued that ancient ideologies still have deep influence on people nowadays, and they should be scientifically analyzed so as to inherit and promote the good parts…

Continue

Posted on October 16, 2014 at 8:33am

Why should I read what you have written?

Why should anyone read what you have written? This should be question No. 1 for anyone writing anything. So, let me rephrase the question: Why do so many of the contributors to the online forums in which I participate assume that people will be interested in what they are writing about, then feel disappointed when no one responds?

As students, we learn to write assignments. The teacher who hands us a topic has to read what we write. But once we leave school and start writing for…

Continue

Posted on October 15, 2014 at 9:41am

The Third International Conference on Applications of Anthropology in Business

     It was my third time to participate in the annual International Conference on Applications of Anthropology in Business, organized by Robert Tian Guang and held at a venue in China, and my second time to visit Jishou University, which is located in the Xiangxi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture in Hunan Province in the west of China. The first two…

Continue

Posted on May 23, 2014 at 4:30am

Who says anthropology can't rock?

Serendipitously, the entertainment section in this morning's Japan Times carries an article about an Indie band, three young Japanese women, called Crunch. One of them, Noriyo Hotta says,



"For example, take 'Mori no Naka,' the first track on the album. This song was influenced by Radiohead, especially the songs 'Jigsaw Falling' and 'There There,' and a funk tune by Japanese rock band Jagatara called 'Tango.' But I was also inspired by a book about the Yanomami tribe in the Amazon.… Continue

Posted on March 5, 2014 at 3:06am

Collective? Individual? Both? How should we think about thinking?

Just found an interesting piece titled "Good Group Think" on eighteen chains.com. Resurrects some shrewd observations by Karl Mannheim, from Ideology and Utopia. Most of what we think we learn from others. We add a bit and pass it on. Tracing the routes is a project called the sociology of knowledge. Enjoy. Reflect. Respond. Pass it on.

Posted on February 3, 2014 at 8:29am — 7 Comments

Comment Wall (31 comments)

You need to be a member of Open Anthropology Cooperative to add comments!

Join Open Anthropology Cooperative

At 6:52am on April 3, 2014, Peter Wogan said…

Thanks, John. Sorry to be away, but nice to know I'm missed! More to follow...

Peter

At 1:43pm on March 2, 2013, Larry Stout said…

The "Grey People" are found at yet another fishing village along the same coast of Gaspesie.  It's a very interesting and scenic drive, all the way around the peninsula.  You see the flag of Acadie flying there, and in parts of New Brunswick,often to the exclusion of the Canada flag.

At 12:17pm on March 2, 2013, Larry Stout said…

Hi, John  -- The "Blue Men" are the work of an old woodcarver who has a shop in a fishing village on the St. Lawrence seaway in Gaspé, Quebec.  He fashioned them from driftwood logs and gave them a beautiful lapis lazuli panache.  I told him that when I win the lottery I'll fly him down to Ozarkistan and pay him handsomely to create similar art for our backyard (near our inukshuk).

At 11:40pm on January 11, 2013, Tracey Thornborrow said…

thanks for that John, I shall check it out! 

At 11:30pm on November 8, 2012, Kate Wood said…

Sorry for the late response, I am not good at social networking! :) 

At 3:45am on September 15, 2012, Keith Hart said…
See OAC Facebook.
At 12:46pm on September 9, 2012, Sheyma Buali said…

sounds great, thanks a lot for the suggestion! im looking at it and it shall indeed be helpful!

At 3:16pm on June 28, 2012, Logan Sparks said…

thanks, John, for the article. its very interesting. I am actually looking into what else Neslihan Cevik has written...

At 2:41am on May 6, 2012, Chelsea Hayman said…

Thank you John for your excellent response and the great clarification! It's been awhile since those undergrad theory classes, but I did learn a lot from them, even though they were so long ago. Now I am trying to manage a theory class in my Master's course that was combined with ethnography -- except the weeks seem to be organized thematically rather than chronologically. Or in order of influence rather than historical period. All of this can be rather frustrating for a student, who can make misleading assumptions based on when the material was presented! All very confusing. Thank you for sorting that information out for me - we did not discuss the Boasians at length in my class but rather focused mostly upon Geertz. Such is the nature of the British school of Anthropology. I'll have to post more blogs about theory - I always have lots of questions and need for clarification. I wish I had more time to learn about the historical context in which some of these ideas developed, but I should have plenty of time when I graduate to read freely. :)

At 11:44am on March 21, 2012, Chelsea Hayman said…

John, firstly, thank you for all of your input. I completely agree with what you said about the 'Western' - the idea is pretty totalizing and inaccurate in and of itself. I've been looking into more ontological theory and non-dualism since I've been studying for my Master's. I think it's easy to set up a dichotomy almost as a polemical point of departure and I guess I have been using it more evocatively in thinking through some of the ideas that have been on my mind for the past couple of weeks. I will look into the material you suggested and see what I can come up with. I suppose my main issue with conceptual categories is that they can be so linguistically conditioned, but they also have some grounding in our ideas about rationality, which can also be variable depending upon one's education. I think that's an idea I've been struggling with. I don't necessarily think the authors are arguing against that point, but it seems to be an often unidentified issue in the cognitive science literature. Of course, the anthropological literature addresses it rather well, on the whole. What are you up to in Japan? I see that you work as an independent scholar - what kinds of work do you do? I'm interested because I've considered a non-academic career in applied anthropology. Thank you again for your input, I appreciate it greatly.

 
 
 

Translate

OAC Press

@OpenAnthCoop

© 2015   Created by Keith Hart.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service